Earlier this month we posted about summer planning for divorced parents. But what if you and your spouse are not yet divorced, how do you plan for your summer vacation?

If you are represented by an attorney, then you should contact your attorney and discuss summer planning. They can contact opposing counsel or the opposing party and help you and your spouse arrive at a summer schedule.   Remember that whatever summer schedule you have this year may or may not be your summer schedule post divorce.

Most counties enter an order at the beginning of any new domestic relations case.  Some counties call it a Domestic Standing Order and others call it a Mutual Restraining Order.  Review that order carefully.  It generally has provisions regarding traveling with the children. Some counties prohibit traveling outside the state with the kids without permission from the other parent and in other counties, travel is permitted but only for a specific duration. 

Regardless, the children will be out of school and you will need to ensure they are properly supervised while both of you are at work.  Contact the other parent and schedule some time to talk about summer vacations, summer camps and summer day care for the kids.   Plan a time to meet to review options.  Unless you are barred by a protective order, consider meeting in a coffee shop or other public place particularly if there are allegations of violence, etc.  If you live far from each other, consider setting up a telephone call, Skype or Facetime. 

Before discussing plans with your spouse, do a little pre-planning.  Review the list from our other summer planning blog post. You shoudl bring the following items to your planning meeting with your spouse:  your kids' school calendar for this year and next year, bring your own calendar which has both personal and work obligations,  nanny/babysitter availability and information regarding summer camps.   We recommend scheduling this meeting to occur in March as many summer camps fill up before the end of April. 

 

Posted
AuthorAdriana Torriente
CategoriesChild Custody